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[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="160" caption="RRSP TFSA Choices"][/caption]People talk to me. Really, total strangers are always striking up conversations with me. Everywhere safe for females to use viagra I go safe for females to use viagra, I make a new friend. My husband says I have “the look”, which tells people I’m friendly and won’t snub their efforts at small talk. Lately, the talk among town is all about RRSP’s and TFSA’s. I’ve heard some grumbling about both, but for the most part, the consensus is “it’s about time”. Canadians have never properly utilized registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSP). Essentially, you can contribute up to 18% of your gross income each year. That contribution reduces your taxable income. Therefore, if you make $30 thousand a year gross income, and contribute 18%, $5400, your taxable income becomes $24 600. Great! Too bad you can’t afford to give up that much of your paycheque for retirement savings. Enter, the Tax Free Savings Account (TFSA). Until now, any interest earned on savings was considered income, and therefore taxable. With the TFSA, you can contribute up to $5000 annually and the interest will not be taxable. Ever. Remember our friend, compound interest? Not taxable. Capital gains? Not taxable. Need to withdraw it - still not taxable. Hooray! The focus of both of these programs is encouraging Canadians to save. Both have benefits and both have drawbacks. Contribution Amounts: TFSA contributions are capped at $5000 for 2009. This limit is subject to change, as it’s indexed by the inflation rate. RRSP contributions are capped at about 18% of gross income. Unused Contributions: Both allow unused contributions to be carried over to following years. Safe for females to use viagra both contribution limits will be updated on your noa (those blue pages you get back from your tax return). Over Contributions: Yes, sigh, both have nasty penalties if you contribute too much. Put your NOA in your sock drawer so you’ll always have it for reference. Tax Deduction: TFSA contributions are not tax deductible. RRSP contributions are. Withdrawals: It’s your money. Of-course you can withdraw it. Since you did [safe for females to use viagra] not get a tax break on your TFSA contribution, there’s no tax due when you take it out. Regular RRSP withdrawals are taxable though. “Clawbacks”: Many Canadians avoid RRSP contributions because they are worried about “clawbacks”. Since RRSP’s are really deferring your income, they are considered income when withdrawn, reducing what you receive for certain government pension programs etc. TFSA’s, are not considered income when withdrawn, and for the most part, don’t hurt eligibility for other programs, including EI (employment insurance). This is only a short list of highlights for TFSA’s and RRSP’s. Both products are available in multiple savings forms; savings accounts, GIC’s, mutual funds etc. Both are registered, meaning your financial institution notifies CRA to earmark your funds under the applicable plan. What it really comes down to is choice. Whether you’re saving for a home, vacation, retirement, or property taxes, the more choices we have, the more control we have over our financial well being.


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